OTHERS, THE

THE PLOT THUS FAR

A woman who lives in a darkened old house with her two photosensitive children becomes convinced that her family home is haunted.

 

WHAT WE THOUGHT

“The Others” is a suspenseful horror film unlike many these days. “The Others” is atmospheric, spooky, bloodless, and carried by strong acting and fleshed out characters. Yet, it takes too long to make an impact and the final payoff is not as shocking as it should be. The plot is simple and not especially innovative (your average ghost story), but it seems fresh thanks to strong acting and a well-crafted, eerie atmosphere that rivals that of a Tim Burton film. Nicole Kidman is Grace, a beautiful young married mother who must raise her two children, Anne (Alakina Mann) and Nicholas (James Bentley) alone in their gigantic (actually, ridiculously large) mansion on a British isle, around the end of WWII. They are alone, for the husband and father has been at war and has not returned, and their housekeepers mysteriously vanished. Suddenly, a trio of friendly caretakers arrive one day.
The best comparison I can make of this film is to a piece of clockwork. Precise, exact, nothing is gratuitous or excessive…. What a subtle charm this film works on you as a spectator. The screenplay is one of the best of this genre I have seen in the last few years, very carefully revised and misleading, yet at the end everything makes perfect sense, not the mention on the second time you watch it. It is true that many of the film’s features and details may be traced to classic films of the genre, but there is nothing wrong with that. The director himself said it was an homage to directors like Alfred Hitchcock (to whom he has been compared somewhat prematurely…. he may reach such height but he still has a long road to walk). That is one of the great things about the film; it takes the best of the genre, the best that has been made by the best directors… it’s a film lover’s delight.

The Blu-Ray comes with the amazing original documentary from the 2-disc DVD Special Edition. There’s also a seemingly new visual effects piece that I don’t remember seeing before. On top of that, the original featurettes and trailer are also presented. The A/V Quality is such an improvement over the original dreary looking DVD, that I have to say that Lionsgate is starting to floor me with these amazing Miramax releases. The 1080p transfer still suffers from the off-color cinematography. Oh well, it’s still worth a purchase.

RELEASE DATE: 09/20/2011

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