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JEAN-LUC GODARD & JEAN-PIERRE GORIN: FIVE FILMS 1968-1971

JEAN-LUC GODARD & JEAN-PIERRE GORIN: FIVE FILMS 1968-1971

JEAN-LUC GODARD & JEAN-PIERRE GORIN: FIVE FILMS 1968-1971 5

GODARD & GORIN: FIVE FILMS 1968-1971 REVIEWED

Godard & Gorin is a celebration of the energy that birthed the Dziga Vertov Group. You’ve heard the name before if you’ve ever hard a third-year film student berate you for liking Hal Needham movies. What you have here are five films birthed out of the emerging French film scene. The first wave died before the 1968 riots and this birthed what came after the Truffaut types. These students have a legit publishing background to canonize their work. These were angry films that made fun of what came before. Hell, British Sounds even crapped all over Godard’s work on “Weekend”.

Lotte in Italia represents what I don’t dig in these films. Basically, they’re Marxists tracts about criticism as a means of forceful correction. Taking the stance of being film radicals, they attack the narrative as it wasn’t dumb enough for non-Marxists to understand. It’s the kind of grandstanding that comes with the SJW crowd, but filtered through their shitheel hippie parents. While time makes fools of us all, it’s fascinating from a socio-archaeological perspective to see where these attitudes must have started. If you can make it through these films, let me know. That being said, their place in history is important.

I just don’t want to visit it more than once.

SPECIAL FEATURES

  • Interview
  • 1971 Schick commercial
  • Featurette
  • Booklet

A/V STATS

  • 1.37:1 1080p transfer
  • LPCM 1.0 MONO

RELEASE DATE: 2/27/18

  • 90%
    Video - 90%
  • 93%
    Audio - 93%
  • 94%
    Special Features - 94%
  • 88%
    Film Score - 88%
91%

The Plot Thus Far

See Also
JEAN-LUC GODARD & JEAN-PIERRE GORIN: FIVE FILMS 1968-1971 9

After finishing his film Weekend in 1967, Jean-Luc Godard shifted gears to embark on engaging more directly with the radical political movements of the era, and thus create a new kind of film, or, as he eventually put it: “new ideas distributed in a new way.” This new method in part involved collaborating with the precocious young critic and journalist, Jean-Pierre Gorin. Both as a two-person unit, and as part of the loose collective known as the Groupe Dziga Vertov (named after the early 20th-century Russian filmmaker and theoretician), Godard and Gorin would realize “some political possibilities for the practice of cinema” and craft new frameworks for investigating the relationships between image and sound, spectator and subject, cinema and society.

Included here are five films, all originally shot in 16mm celluloid, that serve as examples of Godard and Gorin’s revolutionary project.

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