REVIEWSDVDWHITE KING, THE

THE WHITE KING REVIEWED “The White King” suffers from the writing issues that plague most Dystopian fiction aimed at kids. While society and family seem tainted, the kid power factor will always be enough to win the day. Jonathan Pryce does amazingly as the lead kid’s grandfather, but even he can’t get past the logic issues facing the film. If the lead kid is strong enough to break through the constraints of modern society, then...
December 7, 20172 min

THE WHITE KING REVIEWED

“The White King” suffers from the writing issues that plague most Dystopian fiction aimed at kids. While society and family seem tainted, the kid power factor will always be enough to win the day. Jonathan Pryce does amazingly as the lead kid’s grandfather, but even he can’t get past the logic issues facing the film. If the lead kid is strong enough to break through the constraints of modern society, then why make him so young? I have a hard time imagining that scavengers and soldiers couldn’t just beat this kid into the dirt. Oh well, it’s worth checking out.

SPECIAL FEATURES

  • Featurette
  • Interviews

A/V STATS

  • 2.35:1 standard definition transfer
  • Dolby 5.1

RELEASE DATE: 12/5/17

  • 88%
    Video - 88%
  • 87%
    Audio - 87%
  • 90%
    Supplemental Material - 90%
  • 90%
    Film Score - 90%
89%

The Plot Thus Far

Combining elements of George Orwell’s 1984 with J. G. Ballard’s Empire of the Sun, and featuring themes similarly explored in the current hit series “A Handmaid’s Tale” and “The Man in the High Castle,” THE WHITE KING, the debut feature film from co-directors Alex Helfrecht and Jörg Tittel, is a sci-fi drama set in a dystopian future. Based on the internationally acclaimed, award winning novel by György Dragomán, the stark genre film called “eerily prescient given the current state of political affairs” (WOW247) stars Jonathan Pryce (“Game of Thrones”), Agyness Deyn (Sunset Song), Greta Scacchi (“War & Peace”), Ólafur Darri Ólafsson (The BFG), Fiona Shaw (Harry Potter series), Ross Partridge (“Stranger Things”) and newcomer Lorenzo Allchurch.

Djata (Allchurch) is a care-free twelve-year-old growing up in “The Homeland,” a totalitarian state shut off from the outside world. Filled with Big Brother-like surveillance cameras and propaganda posters, the agrarian community at first seems peaceful and orderly, kept safe by an enormous statue dominating the landscape. But when Djata’s father, Peter (Partridge) is whisked away to a deadly work camp, the young boy and his mother, Hannah (Deyn) are labeled traitors and forced to navigate a world of propaganda, abuse and secret police. Before his father was taken away, however, he passed a secret to Djata that could change everything.

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TroyAnderson

Troy Anderson is the Owner/Editor-in-Chief of AndersonVision. He uses a crack team of unknown heroes to bring you the latest and greatest in Entertainment News.

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