TANK GIRL: THREE

WHAT IS IT? In a perfect world, everybody would be able to live like Tank Girl, even if just for a day. The snarl-lipped, occasional tank-driving, semi-postapocalyptic punk scamp...

TANK GIRL: THREE  3


WHAT IS IT?

In a perfect world, everybody would be able to live like Tank Girl, even if just for a day. The snarl-lipped, occasional tank-driving, semi-postapocalyptic punk scamp and her kangaroo lover, Booga, seem to be having a good time even when they’re racing hell-bent across the outback with guns blazing and cigarettes askew, with bloodthirsty madmen on their tail. This time out, Tank Girl and Booga have run afoul of the Aussie mob on a robbery job and are fleeing for their lives as usual, only to come across the ultra-rare Book of Hipster Gold, a lost beatnik epic that has the potential to save the world. Martin’s text makes sense in its own cockeyed way, with the slangy references flying thick as the exhaust and gunfire, livening up one fist fight where the characters announce each punch with Z-movie flair (Wesley Snipes! Christopher Walken! Vinnie Jones!). Dayglo’s art has spit and sawdust galore, with sunset tones fitting the desert outback setting, and sharp angles to punctuate the frequent action. It’s an electric crackle of a book with modish postpunk zip to spare.

THE READ

Tank Girl was more than some British indie comic book creation. She was a proverbial slap in the face to virtually everything mainstream. That is, of course, until she herself became a sellout. This book represents the beginning of her golden age with Martin and Hewlett) at the helm. She’s raunchy, she’s violent, she’s strangely sexy and she gives new meaning to “girl power.” While you may need urbandictionary.com to find out the meaning of all the British slang the authors use, and some gags relate to events of the early 90’s – and are thus outdated, Tank Girl still holds up incredibly well after nearly fifteen years.

THE AFTERMATH

There’s a greater sense of experimenting with the presentation too, as disjointed panels break down any narrative conventions, shaped by more rambling thoughts that almost abandon story. Less emphasis on big explosions and talks, with a greater obsession with sex, drugs and personal experience.

Volume 3 focuses on the ride up to Tank Girl’s big Hollywood movie and the fallout. There’s plenty of jokes about Hollywood not figuring out the concept. Plus, you’ve got Hewlett and Martin talking about the character’s American failure at great length.

There’s some side stories about The Smiths and other Brit culture oddities. Plus, you get to see more adventures from Sub Girl and Jet Girl. I would’ve loved to have seen more of the Kangaroos. All you seem to get is Booga in a supporting role. Oh well, any Tank Girl is better than no Tank Girl.

RELEASE DATE: OUT NOW!

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