Veteran sound editor Michael Benavente joins Formosa Group

Michael J. Benavente, prolific Supervising Sound Editor and a veteran of motion pictures and television, today officially joins the Formosa Group roster. With a resume both distinguished and varied, Benavente is the latest team member addition for the multi-award winning post-production sound company. Formosa Group’s CEO Robert C. Rosenthal made the announcement.

 

“I’m delighted that Michael has joined Formosa Group,” remarked Rosenthal. “His sterling reputation within the creative community coupled with his talent perfectly matches our company philosophy.”

 

“I’m really excited to join Formosa, because I feel they are the apex of what’s being done today in sound for film and television, in terms of quality,” noted Benavente. “Who wouldn’t want to be part of a group who does such stellar work that everybody admires?”

 

A graduate of the UCLA Film School, Benavente inaugurated his audio career learning the craft under the tutelage of award-winning sound editors Richard Anderson, Stephen Flick and Mark Mangini. Working his way through the ranks, Michael officially achieved Supervising Sound Editor status with back-to-back feature films in 1998: Doctor Dolittle starring Eddie Murphy and There’s Something About Mary from the always irreverent Farrelly Brothers. In 2015, Michael did his first film for Television, winning an Emmy for Outstanding Sound Editing in a Limited Series, Movie or Special for the History Channel’s docudrama “Houdini.”

 

While Benavente’s impressive release roster contains numerous comedies (including Analyze This, Bad Santa, Idiocracy, Paul Blart: Mall Cop, and Private Parts), he’s far from being pigeonholed within one genre. His artistry has enriched other categories including horror (Drag Me to Hell, Hollow Man), epics (2012), science fiction (Starship Troopers), superheroes (The Green Hornet) and animation (Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakuel, Surf’s Up). Upcoming feature releases are Zach Braff’s Going in Style, Andrew Cohen’s The House and Philip Noyce’s Above Suspicion.

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