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LIFT, THE

LIFT, THE 3

THE LIFT REVIEWED

“The Lift” finally returns to American home video thanks to Blue Underground. While it might have seemed far-fetched back in 1983, it’s almost stunning with its predictions. Playing with the idea of artificial intelligence gone rogue is amazing for a film of this era. It makes the elevators acting like predators make much more sense. Especially, if it’s a rogue program working on its own designs. The sequence with the little girl is the best, hence why it gets used for the poster art.

Many have said they could’ve seen American horror masters of the era trying to tackle a movie like this. While I agree, the foreign nature of the movie plays to its strengths. Everything presented here feels needed and deadly. Tone is missing from a ton of modern horror, but this film dives deep into it. In the review for Down, I mentioned how I thought its lack of depth was done in a mocking way. But, even as satire…it kills the scary appeal that The Lift deploys.

I’ve watched the movie four times already and I plan on watching it again.

SPECIAL FEATURES

  • Commentary
  • Interview
  • Short Film
  • Trailers
  • Poster & Still Gallery

A/V STATS

  • 1.66:1 1080p transfer
  • DTS-HD 5.1 master audio track

RELEASE DATE: 10/31/17

SCREENSHOTS

LIFT, THE 5 LIFT, THE 7 LIFT, THE 9 LIFT, THE 11

  • 93%
    Video - 93%
  • 93%
    Audio - 93%
  • 95%
    Supplemental Material - 95%
  • 92%
    Film Score - 92%
93%

The Plot Thus Far

There is something very wrong with the elevator in a stylish office high-rise. The passengers never end up on the floor of their choice. They end up dead! When Felix, an inquisitive repairman, investigates the faulty deathtrap, he discovers that something other than malfunctioning machinery is to blame. Some dark, distorted power has gained control of the elevator for its own evil design. After his horrifying discovery is given the shaft by the authorities, he joins a nosy female journalist to battle the unholy force inside THE LIFT! Stars Huub Stapel and Willeke van Ammelrooy

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