JAMES BOND OMNIBUS, THE – VOLUME 1


WHAT IS IT?

James Bond, the world’s most famous secret agent, has thrilled audiences for over fifty years with his globe-trotting adventures. THE JAMES BOND OMNIBUS collects eleven of Ian Fleming’s original daily comic strips for the very first time in a mammoth omnibus edition.

Including the stories: CASINO ROYALE, LIVE AND LET DIE, MOONRAKER, DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER, FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE, DR. NO, GOLDFINGER, FROM A VIEW TO A KILL, FOR YOUR EYES ONLY and THUNDERBALL.

THE READ

The daily newspaper strip format, that has given me great joy in the form of Schulz, Watterson, Breathed and more, just doesn’t feel right for the longer form of adventure stories. Feel free to shoot me down over this, but I just can’t see how a good ongoing adventure narrative over 100+ daily strips can possibly work – the endless stop, start nature of the thing just renders it an unsatisfying experience.


THE AFTERMATH

Although it works as both a historical document of 50s adventure strips and as a nostalgia artifact for those that remember if the first time around, I was surprised at how well the stories also hold up to modern reading. Obviously, there are moments of political incorrectness that wouldn’t be acceptable in a modern strip, but that aside, the stories are enjoyable and engaging, and offer the kind of espionage-based thriller that would barely make it into modern comic shops.

Fans of the film series will be a little alienated by having so much Fleming thrown in their face. Sorry fellows, but the gadgets of the EON films are nowhere to be found here. What I was surprised to see was how well received the short stories were in illustrated serial format. “For Your Eyes Only” and “Risico” shined with a new light uncompared to previous versions. Hell, I found myself also enjoying long-time disliked adventure “From a View to a Kill”.

In the end, the book will go to the collections of long-time spy fiction fans. It’s not so much for comic fans, but it’ll work as a nice throwback to the 1950s/1960s newspaper domination of Europe and North America. I would compare it to Fantagraphics’ recent work with The Complete Peanuts. If that strikes your fancy, then I’d recommend the purchase. 

RELEASE DATE: 12/01/09

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