HANDMAID’S TALE, THE

THE HANDMAID’S TALE REVIEWED

“The Handmaid’s Tale” is speculative fiction and not Sci-Fi. I remember having intense arguments about this fact while in college. Works like this are treated like primers for incoming freshmen at Liberal Arts bastions. After having to read the book in two different classes, I was thrilled to hear a film version existed. Hell, it was written by Pinter and directed by the guy that did The Tin Drum. It had to be able to mine the better ideas out of Atwood’s original story. Right?!?

What Pinter and Schlondorff did was strip out the ambiguity in the original novel. The ending is far more clear-cut, but keeps the sense of hopelessness. Duvall’s character is portrayed as a direct villain with a taste for rough sex. The speculation of the world’s future doesn’t exist like it did in the Novel. However, the overall paranoid feel is worn like a shroud over this movie. But, it’s Atwood.

Margaret Atwood is one of those writers that always hangs like a cloud over Leftist thought. The Left enjoys slamming schlock like Left Behind or whatever revisionist history piece that O’Reilly is shilling this year. What they fail to do is turn an eye to speculative liberal pieces that conjure worlds that snobbishly slam societal constraints as destroying the Left’s idealistic/fictional Utopia. Answers aren’t delivered in stories like this, as answers get in the way of appeals to emotion. While I didn’t enjoy the source work, it’s fascinating to watch this movie and see the adaptation efforts.

SPECIAL FEATURES

  • Nothing

A/V STATS

  • 1.85:1 1080p transfer
  • DTS-HD 2.0

RELEASE DATE: 4/18/17

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