DAUGHTERS OF THE DUST

DAUGHTERS OF THE DUST REVIEWED

“Daughters of the Dust” is one of the unsung heroes of the early 1990s Independent Film movement. The film was the first wide release picture directed by an African American woman. This period piece focuses on the Gullah culture, while also examining how a group of women continue their culture. Many of the classic shots were lifted for Beyonce Knowles’ work on “Lemonade”. Hell, Rachel Bloom even lifted the lift for “Love Kernels” in Season 2 of “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend”.

So, why does this film remain so appealing 25 years after its initial release? While slow cultural studies were new to Indie cinema in the early 90s, it feels like old hat now. But, any effort to investigate underseen American societal niches deserves a wider audience. Growing up as a cultural academic, it was years before I got to sit down and appreciate this film. It’s one of those cinematography giants that gets featured a ton in textbooks. But, isn’t that the case with certain arthouse sacred cows?

“Daughters of the Dust” works because it captures a point in time without slamming it over your head. Once you finish the disc, make sure to check out the special features. Cohen is killing it with these supplemental heavy approaches to Indie majors.

SPECIAL FEATURES

  • Interviews
  • Q&A
  • Commentary
  • Trailer

A/V STATS

  • 1.85:1 1080p transfer
  • LPCM 2.0

RELEASE DATE: 4/11/17

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