BIG LEBOWSKI, THE: LIMITED EDITION

 

THE PLOT THUS FAR

“Dude” Lebowski, mistaken for a millionaire Lebowski, seeks restitution for his ruined rug and enlists his bowling buddies to help get it.

 

WHAT WE THOUGHT

The Dude is an unlikely hero living in the city of Los Angeles who becomes embroiled in a botched kidnapping. This is not the average kidnapper comedy that has been seen a thousand times before. The Coen brothers take a fresh look at an old tired subject. The story they have created is intriguing and entertaining, but the true entertainment comes from the unique characters. Walter, played by John Goodman, is a Vietnam veteran who seems to have some parts of post traumatic stress syndrome. Donny, another one of The Dude’s close friends, is a quiet unassuming character who often interjects into conversation, but no one pays close attention to what he says.

As well as these characters are written, they would not be as effective had they been played by other actors. This effectiveness of acting can be seen in the opening scene at the bowling alley where the supporting characters are first introduced. This scene is comprised of Donny, Walter, and The Dude sitting at their lane in the bowling alley discussing the attack on The Dude by some hired thugs (7min 25 sec). The Dude is approaching the situation in his usual lackadaisical way. Jeff Bridges conveys The Dude’s overall demeanor in his laid back, sauntering, walk. Although being laid back, Bridges is direct in his speaking showing that The Dude is not the average confused old stoner. Bridges facial expressions during this scene show The Dude is distressed about the loss of his rug which ‘tied the room together.’ Donny seems to be an outside observer in this scene and throughout much of the film. Buscemi conveys his character’s attention during discussion by following the flow of the conversation with his head. He looks from The Dude to Walter and from Walter to The Dude depending on who is talking. He may seem to be paying attention, but his asking of simple questions dispels this assumption. Another technique Buscemi uses is while he is observing the conversation he furrows his brow as if in deep thought and contemplation.

The Blu-Ray comes with a ton of featurettes, a look at the widely successful Lebowski Fest and a collection of Jeff Bridges’ photographs. The A/V Quality is pretty sharp with a damn near flawless transfer and an impeccable DTS-HD 5.1 master audio track. I’m a big fan of the book bound style Blu-Ray cases, however I hate the fact that the Digital Copy insert is so easy to lose. Plus, it’s on the back of an ad for Jeff Bridges’ food charity thing. I hate to be that awful, but it’s easy to pitch that due to the charity plea. In the end, it’s the best looking I’ve seen the film ever. That’s quite the compliment from someone who has send a theatrical print of this film more than 10 times.

RELEASE DATE: OUT NOW!

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: