ADJUSTMENT BUREAU, THE

 

THE PLOT THUS FAR

The affair between a politician and a ballerina is affected by mysterious forces keeping the lovers apart.

 

WHAT WE THOUGHT

David Norris (Matt Damon) is a rising New York Congressman with his heart set on becoming a young Senator, everything is going according to plan until he meets the beautiful quirky ballerina, Elise (Emily Blunt) in a mens’ restroom. Elise inspires him in ways that he could not have imagined but any longer term relationship is not part of the plan the “Men in Grey” have mapped out. They do not like their careful plans messed with, ever. Although they do get to wear Trilby’s, which not only look cool but are also a necessary tool for their profession.

The many scenes between Blunt and Damon are very believable and natural, real chemistry in action and is fun to watch. Blunt is a breath of fresh air in the congressman’s driven life, living more in the moment than he possibly ever did before. Creativity and intelligence are two things that are usually lacking from blockbusters. The Adjustment Bureau is a film that has a bit more to it than you’re probably expecting. Based on “The Adjustment Group,” a short story by Philip K. Dick (Blade Runner, Total Recall, Minority Report), The Adjustment Bureau has probably already caught your attention either because you’re a fan of Dick’s work and/or the movies that were adapted from it.

The film’s charm is definitely in its explanation for things. The way the bureau works and how they function is a wonder in itself. You’ll never look at a door or a man wearing a hat the same way again after viewing the film. Perhaps the most interesting is Thompson’s explanation of how events in history like The Great Depression and The Holocaust came about. The story is very imaginative and different from the norm, which is always a fantastic change in pace when it comes to film. At the same time though, those who like having absolutely everything explained to them will probably be disappointed. The Adjustment Bureau explains enough to get the wheels in your brain turning and leaves some things open to your interpretation, which could hurt someone’s overall opinion of the film depending on the viewer.

The DVD comes with a ton of featurettes, deleted scenes and related hangers-on. The A/V Quality is strong for standard definition with the various chase sequences making the most out of the Dolby 5.1 soundstage. However, I found the transfer to be muddled with background action during night scenes. This is a minor quibble, as it doesn’t take away from the main show. Still, it was enough of a problem to be noticeable. In the end, I’d recommend checking out the Blu-Ray to buy and sticking with the DVD to rent.
RELEASE DATE: OUT NOW!
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